King Darius is Devastated at Gaugamela

Alexander Outmanuevered Darius in the Battle of Gaugamela

On October 1, 331, near the village of Gaugamela, Alexander defeated Darius’s huge army with skill and daring. The Persian empire had received its death blow.

Alexander the Great was greatly outnumbered by King Darius’s army at the village of Gaugamela. Additionally, Darius had equipped his troops with 200 scythed chariots with scythes on the wheels and long spears at the tip of the pole. These instruments of death and destruction were intended to terrorize the Macedonian’s troops. Alexander won the Battle of Gaugamela with his superior military strategy.

Darius Orders His Scythian and Bactrian Horse to Attack Alexander’s Flank

Darius was afraid that Alexander’s approaching right wing would force his troops to fight on difficult terrain. Subsequently, Darius ordered his scythian chariots to attack Alexander’s flank.

Alexander sent his light cavalry to counter the scythian threat which was a failure. The chariot drivers, as Urich Wilken mentions in his Alexander the Great book, were killed by Alexander’s Agrianians and archers and Alexander’s troops formed lanes, which nullified any potential damage the scythians could have done.

Darius Flees Alexander’s Devastating Force

As the two opposing forces drew closer, Alexander noticed an opening in the Persian left wing. He rushed into the gap with his Hetairoi and began wheeling to the left, with purpose of rolling up the enemy’s line towards the center. The Macedonian phalanx made a fierce attack from the front with their long pikes. Darius felt greatly threatened by this ferocious attack of Alexander’s and was the first to flee in his chariot.

Alexander could not pursue Darius because his left wing under Parmenio was in a serious struggle with the Persian right wing led by Mazaeus, who had outflanked Parmenio. Additionally, the Indian and Persian cavalry of the right wing penetrated an opening in Alexander’s second line and headed towards the camp of Alexander.

Alexander’s second line wheeled around and took the Orientals in the rear, which caused a severe loss to the Indians and Persians. The Hetairroi lost over sixty lives and Hephaestion, Alexander’s closest friend, was wounded in the leg.

Alexander Pursues Darius

The Oriental cavalry had escaped and Alexander finally reached Permenio, who no longer needed help. The Thessalian cavalry had been victorious, which meant Alexander’s line was victorious. Alexander immediately began his pursuit of Darius.

The pursuit lasted until sundown. Alexander resumed his chase at mid-night and arrived the next day at Arbela. Darius was not there, except for his treasure and baggage. Apparently Darius escaped over the Kurdish mountains into Media.

Finally, news came to Alexander that Darius was being held captive in his own camp by Bessus and his followers. When Alexander found Darius, July 330 B. C., he was already dead. Alexander eventually had Bessus’s nose and ears cut off and then he had Darius’s brother, Oxyathres, crucify him.

Alexander Overcame Darius’s Expensively Equipped Army

Alexander the Great won the Battle of Gaugamela because of his superior military skills. King Darius had Alexander outnumbered with a huge and well equipped army.

The scythed chariots, which Darius relied on, were totally ineffective against the King of Macedonia’s troops because Alexander was prepared with a brilliant counter strategy. Again Alexander used his battle array strategy with such dynamic force, that King Darius became totally terrorized and ran away from the battle.

Additionally, the finality of the Battle of Gaugamela was decided by superior leadership and great discipline displayed by Alexander’s troops.Alexander the Great was greatly outnumbered by King Darius’s army at the village of Gaugamela. Additionally, Darius had equipped his troops with 200 scythed chariots with scythes on the wheels and long spears at the tip of the pole. These instruments of death and destruction were intended to terrorize the Macedonian’s troops. Alexander won the Battle of Gaugamela with his superior military strategy.

Darius Orders His Scythian and Bactrian Horse to Attack Alexander’s Flank

Darius was afraid that Alexander’s approaching right wing would force his troops to fight on difficult terrain. Subsequently, Darius ordered his scythian chariots to attack Alexander’s flank.

Alexander sent his light cavalry to counter the scythian threat which was a failure. The chariot drivers, as Urich Wilken mentions in his Alexander the Great book, were killed by Alexander’s Agrianians and archers and Alexander’s troops formed lanes, which nullified any potential damage the scythians could have done.

Darius Flees Alexander’s Devastating Force

As the two opposing forces drew closer, Alexander noticed an opening in the Persian left wing. He rushed into the gap with his Hetairoi and began wheeling to the left, with purpose of rolling up the enemy’s line towards the center. The Macedonian phalanx made a fierce attack from the front with their long pikes. Darius felt greatly threatened by this ferocious attack of Alexander’s and was the first to flee in his chariot.

Alexander could not pursue Darius because his left wing under Parmenio was in a serious struggle with the Persian right wing led by Mazaeus, who had outflanked Parmenio. Additionally, the Indian and Persian cavalry of the right wing penetrated an opening in Alexander’s second line and headed towards the camp of Alexander.

Alexander’s second line wheeled around and took the Orientals in the rear, which caused a severe loss to the Indians and Persians. The Hetairroi lost over sixty lives and Hephaestion, Alexander’s closest friend, was wounded in the leg.

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